Beekeeping for Beginners (2011)

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice tells of the meeting between young Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes.  Now, Holmes tells his side of that fateful encounter:

Every so often, perhaps once a year, I would become aware of what is known as a “fan.” These were generally village lads with too much time on their hands and too many penny-dreadful novels on their shelves. Trial and error had shown that a terse lecture on personal rights coupled with a threat to speak to their fathers would send them on their way.

Now, it seemed, I had another one.

I turned to watch the owner of the slow footsteps approach. The lad was wearing an old and too-large suit, a jersey in place of shirt and waistcoat (it had been cold that morning when I—and, it appeared, he—had set out) and a badly knit scarf, with a cloth cap pulled down to his ears and shoes that, despite being new, pinched his toes. His nose was buried in a book, as if to demonstrate his noble oblivion to any world-famous detectives who might be hunkered on the ground.

But he had misjudged either his path or his speed, because he was aimed right at me. I waited, but when he neither shifted course nor launched into a performance of astonishment, I cleared my throat…

 

A longer excerpt is here.  And if you wish to compare Russell’s version of events, go here.

Click here to buy in the US, or here to buy in the UK


 

Links

Laurie’s blog post on writing Beekeeping for Beginners is here.

One reader’s vision of The Meeting, in a video, here.

What was London like in the summer of 1915?  Read about it here.

Like a virtual tour of Spitalfields Market?

Read about the sinking of the Lusitania here.

Zeppelins attacked London with impunity during the beginning of the Great War.  Here is a short film of them.

Vanity Fair’s take on life in London during the War, including Belgian refugees, fashion tips, and searchlights (click to enlarge):

Click the hive, above, for a gallery of images related to the book.